History of Nova Scotia
with special attention given to
Communications and Transportation

Chapter 63
2000 July 19-31




2000 July 19

Gasoline Prices Hover Around 80¢ a Litre

Gas retailers are now required to post their gasoline prices for the passing motorist to see, and almost all retailers have complied with the new law.  The lowest gasoline prices in Inverness County are still in Waycobah and Whycocomagh.  Recent prices across Inverness County: [Inverness Oran, 19 July 2000]


2000 July 19

Connect Time Poll

This week, the Nova Scotia Power website is asking its visitors to participate in a poll: "How many hours a week do you spend on the Internet?" There were three choices: "0-5", "6-10", or "more than 10".  At 5:30am on Saturday, July 22nd, the report was:
Thank you for taking the time to answer our survey.  The results so far are:
Question: How many hours a week do you spend on the Internet?
Total votes cast: 70
Result so far:
23% have chosen "0-5"
27% have chosen "6-10"
50% have chosen "more than 10"

Source:
NS Power website http://www.nspower.ca/YourHome/


2000 July 19-24

Tall Ships at Halifax



List  of  83  Sailing  Ships
in Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia

19-24 July 2000
Ship's Name Home Port Class,
Rigging
Launched
Akogare Osaka
Japan
class B
topsail schooner
3 masts
1992
http://www.akogare.or.jp/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/akogare.shtml
Alice Wragg Bristol
England
class C
cutter
1999
Petite Riviere
Nova Scotia
http://www.coveyisland.com/wragg.html
http://www.coveyisland.com/news2.html
http://www.coveyisland.com/AWaccomm.html
Amerigo Vespucci La Spezia
Italy
class A
full rigged
1931
Castellamare di Stalia
Italy
http://www.portocv.etruria.net/mare_vivo/vespucci.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/amerigo_vespucci.shtml
Arethusa Lower Upnor
Kent
England
class CII
ketch
1982
Ipswich
England
http://www.asto.org.uk/arethusa.htm
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/arethusa/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/arethusa.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/arethusa.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page131c.html#Arethusa
Arung Samudera Jakarta
Indonesia
class B
schooner
3 masts
1991
New Zealand
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/arung_samudera.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/arungsamudera.htm
Asgard II Dublin
Ireland
class AII
brigantine
1981
County Wexford
Ireland
http://www.asgard2.i-p.com/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/asgard_ii.shtml
Bat'kivshchyna Kiev
Ukraine
class B
schooner
 
http://discover-ukraine.kiev.ua/eng/batkivshchina.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page132a.html#Batkivshchyna
Bel Espoir Brest
France
class A
topsail schooner
3 masts
1944
Svendborg
Denmark
http://www.dbay.com/Tall/bel.html
http://www.concar.net/Belespoir/be.shtml
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/bel_espoir_ii.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/belespoir.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page132b.html#Bel_Espoir
Blitz Genoa
Italy
class CIII
sloop
1998
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/blitz.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/blitz.htm
Bluenose II Canada class B
schooner
1963
Smith & Rhuland
Lunenburg
Nova Scotia
http://www.bluenose2.ns.ca/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/bluenose_ii.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/bluenose.htm
Bowdoin Castine
Maine
U.S.A.
class C
schooner
1921
Boothbay
Maine, U.S.A.
http://209.222.220.16/mma/Bowdoin/TheArcticSchooner.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/bowdoin.shtml
Brilliant Mystic
Connecticut
U.S.A.
class C
schooner
1932
New York
U.S.A.
http://www.mysticseaport.org/visiting/exhibits/ships.boats/brilliant.html
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/brillian.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/brilliant.shtml
Californian Long Beach
California
U.S.A.
class B
topsail schooner
1984
San Diego
California
http://www.californian.org/htm/shipinfo.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/californian.shtml
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/calfschn.html
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page133a.html#Californian
Capitan Miranda Montevideo
Uruguay
class A
schooner
1930
Spain
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page133a.html#Capitan_Miranda
Chance Bermuda class C
cutter
May 2000
Petite Riviere
Nova Scotia
http://www.coveyisland.com/chance.html
Chessie Racing Baltimore
Maryland
U.S.A.
class CII
ketch
 
http://www.charm.net/~madisonw/
http://www.digigate.net/whitbread/chessie.htm
Concordia Nassau
Bahamas
or Quebec
class A
barquentine
1992
Szczecin
Poland
http://www.classafloat.com/g.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/concordia.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page133b.html#Concordia
Concordia Oslo
Norway
class CI
ketch
1985
Rostock
Germany
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/concordia1.shtml
Danmark Copenhagen
Denmark
full rigged
3 masts
1933
Nakskov Shipyard
Denmark
http://www.sofartsstyrelsen.dk/skoleskibet/index.html
http://www.denmarkemb.org/ship.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/danmark.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page134a.html#Danmark
Dar Mlodziezy Gdynia
Poland
class A
full rigged
1981
Gdansk
Poland
http://home.t-online.de/home/rolf.joachim.scheu/homepage.htm
http://www.wsm.gdynia.pl/statki/index-e.html (English)
http://www.wsm.gdynia.pl/statki/daropise.htm (Dar Mlodziezy specs)
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/dar_mlodziezy.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page134a.html#Dar_Mlodziezy
Dasher Gosport
England
class CIII
cutter
1977
Gosport
England
http://www.rafsail.org.uk/offshore/tall_ships_2000.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/dasher.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/dasher.htm
Dewa Ruci Surabaya
Indonesia
class A
barquentine
1952
Hamburg
Germany
Eagle New London
Connecticut
U.S.A.
class A
barque
3 masts
1936
Hamburg
Germany
http://www.cga.edu/eagle/default.htm
http://www.maritimeheritage.org/tallships/eagle.html
http://www.uscg.mil/datasheet/wixtrain.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page135a.html#Eagle_1
East Wind Poland class CII
ketch
 
Eendracht Netherlands class A
schooner
1974
Amsterdam
Netherlands
http://www.eendracht.nl/
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page135a.html#Eendracht
Eleanor Mary Cowes
Isle of Wight
England
class CI
cutter
1998
Petite Riviere
Nova Scotia
http://www.coveyisland.com/wn51.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/eleanor_mary.shtml
Elsie Baddeck
Nova Scotia
Canada
class C
yawl
1917
Baddeck
Nova Scotia
http://www.elsiecharters.com/
http://www.nicholsonyachts.com/yacht/Elsie/nav.htm
http://www.nicholsonyachts.com/yacht/Elsie/brochure.htm
http://dundeeresort.com/articles.html
http://www.atosea.com/atlantic.html
Ernestina New Bedford
Massachusetts
U.S.A.
class B
schooner
1894
Essex
Massachusetts
http://www.ernestina.org/
http://www.umassd.edu/specialprograms/caboverde/ernestina.html
http://www.cr.nps.gov/maritime/nhl/ernest.htm
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/ernestin.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/ernestina.shtml
Esmeralda Valparaiso
Chile
class A
barquentine
1952
Cadiz
Spain
http://www.mcall.com/html/special/opsail/esmerelda.htm
http://www.icon.co.za/~glenpurdon/other/esmeralda/history.htm
http://www.newzeal.com/steve/Ships/esmeralda.htm
http://www.hazegray.org/worldnav/americas/chile.htm
http://www.pilotonline.com/news/nw0615arr.html
http://www.tni.org/history/letelier/tnidocs/180600.htm
http://search.boston.com/dailyglobe2/187/
    oped/A_Tall_Ship_with_a_long_bloody_past+.shtml
Esprit Bremen
Germany
class CII
schooner
1996
Bremen
Germany
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/esprit.shtml
Europa Amsterdam
Netherlands
class A
barque
1911
Hamburg
Germany
http://www.barkeuropa.com/english/english.htm
http://www.tallship-friends.de/ships.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/europa.shtml
Eye of the Wind Penzance
Cornwall
England
class AII
brigantine
1911
Brake Unterveser
Germany
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/eye_of_the_wind.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/eyeofthewind.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page135c.html#Eye_of_the_Wind
Fair Jeanne Kingston
Ontario
Canada
class AII
brigantine
2 masts
1982
Ottawa
Ontario
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/fair_jeanne.shtml
Gloria Cartegna
Colombia
class A
barque
3 masts
1968
Bilbao
Spain
http://www.osakawtc.or.jp/sailosaka/shipdata/gloria/gloria.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/gloria.shtml
Grand Nellie St. Thomas
Virgin Islands
U.S.A.
class C
schooner
1999
http://www.grandnellie.com/
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page137b.html#Grand_Nellie
Gringo La Plata
Argentina
class B
brigantine
1886
Roncallo Shipyard
Italy
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/gringo.shtml
Gulliver of Southampton Hamble
England
class CIII
yawl
1978
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/gulliver_of_southampton.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/gulliverofsouthampton.htm
Harvey Gamage Islesboro
Maine
U.S.A.
class CI
schooner
1973
South Bristol
Maine, U.S.A.
http://www.sailgamage.org/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/harvey_gamage.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/harveygamage.htm
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/harveyga.html
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page138a.html#Harvey_Gamage
Hayseed IV Chester
Nova Scotia
Canada
class C
sloop
1912
New York
http://www.nationalpost.com/content/features/festivals/081399a.html
Hebe III Mediterranean
Czech Republic
class CIII
sloop
1999
Les Herbiers
France
http://www.yachting.cz/hebe/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/hebe_iii.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/hebe3.htm
Highlander Sea Halifax
Nova Scotia
Canada
class B
schooner
1924
Essex
Massachusetts
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/highlander_sea.shtml
Ice Maiden U.K. class CII
sloop
1997
Southampton
England
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/ice_maiden.shtml
Idea Due Gallipoli
Italy
class CI
schooner
1986
Fano
Italy
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/idea_due.shtml
Ikar Nikolaev
Ukraine
class CI
sloop
 
http://www.invest.mk.ua/nikolaev.htm
Jens Krogh Aalborg
Denmark
class CI
ketch
1899
Frederikshavn
Denmark
http://www.jenskrogh.dk/
http://www.vision.auc.dk/~oka/jenskrog.htm
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page140a.html#Jens_Krogh
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/jenskrogh.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/jens_krough.shtml
John Laing Portsmouth
England
class CIII
ketch
1990
http://www.asto.org.uk/ocean.htm
http://www.oyc.org.uk/
http://www.oyc.org.uk/OYTSouth.htm
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/johnlaing.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/john_laing.shtml
Jolie Brise Hamble
England
class CI
cutter
1913
LeHavre
France
http://www.joliebrise.com/
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/joliebrise.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/jolie_brise.shtml
Kaiwo Maru Tokyo
Japan
class A
barque
4 masts
1989
Yokosuka
Japan
http://www.osakawtc.or.jp/sailosaka/shipdata/kaiwomaru/kaiwomaru.html
http://www.maritimeheritage.org/tallships/kaiwo.html
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page141a.html#Kaiwo_Maru_II
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/kaiwo_maru_ii.shtml
Kruzenshtern Kaliningrad
Russia
class A
barque
4 masts
1926
Bremerhaven
Germany
http://www.tallship-friends.de/ships.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/kruzenshtern.shtml
Kukri Gosport
England
class CIII
sloop
1975
Gosport
England
http://www.rafsail.org.uk/offshore/tall_ships_2000.htm
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/kukri.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/kukri.shtml
Lettie G. Howard New York
U.S.A.
class B
gaff topsail
schooner
1893
Essex
Massachusetts
http://www.southstseaport.org/shiphow.htm
http://home.infi.net/~kredden/ships/lghoward.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/lettie_g_howard.shtml
Libertad Buenos Aires
Argentina
class A
full rigged
1960
Rio Santaigo
Argentina
http://www.ara.mil.ar/informacion/fragata_libertad/index.htm
http://www.osakawtc.or.jp/sailosaka/shipdata/libertad/libertad.html
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page142b.html#Libertad
http://www.cibernautica.com.ar/fragatalibertad/
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/libertad.htm
Lord Nelson Southampton
England
class A
barque
3 masts
1986
Southampton
England
http://www.jst.org.uk/lord_nel/index.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/lord_nelson.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page142c.html#Lord_Nelson
Maiden Hamble
England
class CIII
sloop
1980
http://www.maiden-international.com/about.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/maiden.shtml
Mir St. Petersburg
Russia
class A
full rigged
1987
Gdansk
Poland
http://www.tallship-friends.de/ships.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/mir.shtml
Mist of Avalon Halifax
Nova Scotia
Canada
class C
gaff rigged
schooner
1967
Mahone Bay
Nova Scotia
http://www.schoonerman.com/mist-avn.htm
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/mistofavalon.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/mist_of_avalon.shtml
Mistral U.S.A. class C
schooner
 
Misty Isles U.S.A. class C
ketch
 
Morning Star
of Revelation
Chatham
Kent
England
class CI
gaff rigged
ketch
1981
http://www.morningstar.org.uk/mst.html
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/morningstarofrevelation.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/morning_star_of_revelation.shtml
Niagara Erie
Pennsylvania
U.S.A.
class A
brig
1988
Erie
Pennsylvania
http://www.brigniagara.org/
http://moose.erie.net/~chamber/niagara.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/niagara.shtml
Noble Dream Canada class C  
Norfolk Rebel Norfolk
Virginia
U.S.A.
class C
gaff rigged
schooner
tugatine
1980
http://www.schoonerman.com/rebel.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/norfolk_rebel.shtml
NV Hamburg Germany class C
 
Ocean Spirit
of Moray
Elgin
Scotland
class CII
ketch
1995
Ipswich
England
http://www.gordonstoun.org.uk/grdnstn/seaman.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/ocean_spirit_of_moray.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/oceanspiritofmoray.htm
Oostershelde Rotterdam
Netherlands
class B
topsail schooner
3 masts
1917
Netherlands
http://www.oosterschelde.nl/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/oosterschelde.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page145a.html#Oosterschelde
Ouais Ouais Canada class C
cutter
1976
British Columbia
Picton Castle Avatiu, Rarotonga
Cook Islands
class A
barque
1928
Selby
England
http://www.picton-castle.com/index.html
http://www.brigantineinn.com/tall_ships.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/picton_castle.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page146c.html#Picton_Castle
Pogoria Gdynia
Poland
class A
barquentine
3 masts
1980
Gdansk
Poland
http://www.oceanmasters.com/pogoria.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/pogoria.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page146c.html#Pogoria
Pride of Baltimore II Baltimore
Maryland
U.S.A.
class B
topsail schooner
2 masts
1988
Baltimore
Maryland
http://www.intandem.com/NewPrideSite/
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/pride2.html
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/pride_of_baltimore_ii.shtml
Road to the Isles Canada class C
schooner
 
Roald Amundsen Wolgast
Germany
class A
brig
1952
Rorlau
East Germany
http://www.sailtraining.de/roald.html
http://www.c@llas.de/e_index.html
http://www.c@llas.de/e_roald.html
http://www.tallship-friends.de/ships.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/roald_amundsen.shtml
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page148c.html#Roald_Amundsen
Rona II London
England
class CIII
ketch
1991
London
England
http://www.lsp.org.uk/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/rona_ii.shtml
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/rona.htm
Rose Bridgeport
Connecticut
U.S.A.
class A
full rigged
3 masts
1970
Smith & Rhuland
Lunenburg
Nova Scotia
http://www.hmsrose.org/
http://www.tallshiprose.org/
http://www.brigantineinn.com/tall_ships.html
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/hmsrose.htm
http://www.tallship-friends.de/ships.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/hms_rose.shtml
St. Lawrence II Kingston
Ontario
Canada
class C
brigantine
1955
Kingston
Ontario
http://web.ctsolutions.com/brigantine/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/st_lawrence_ii.shtml
Sarie Marais
of Plymouth
Plymouth
England
class CIII
sloop
1993
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/sarie_marais_of_plymouth.shtml
Sherman Zwicker Boothbay Harbor
Maine, U.S.A.
class B
schooner
1942
Smith & Rhuland
Lunenburg
Nova Scotia
http://www.schoonermuseum.org/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/sherman_zwicker.shtml
Soren Larsen Auckland
New Zealand
class AII
brigantine
1949
Nykobing Mors
Denmark
http://www.sorenlarsen.co.nz/
http://www.tallshipnewswire.com/page149c.html#Soren_Larsen
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/sorenlarsen.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/soren_larsen.shtml
Spirit of Massachusetts Boston
Massachusetts
U.S.A.
class B
schooner
1984
Boston
Massachusetts
http://www.sfcinc.org/spirit/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/spirit_of_massachusetts.shtml
http://www.classicschooner.com/vessels/spiritmas.html
Spray U.S.A. class C
ketch
 
Stella Polare Livorno
Italy
class CIII
yawl
1965
Chiavari
Italy
http://www.marina.difesa.it/navi/stellapol.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/stella_polare.shtml
Walross III Berlin
Germany
class CIII
ketch
1971
Nautor
Finland
http://www.asv-berlin.de/
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/walross_iii.shtml
Zenobe Gramme Zeebrugge
Belgium
class CII
ketch
1961
Temse
Belgium
http://www.mil.be/marine/eng/700gr.htm
http://www.tallshipscharleston.com/zenobegramme.htm
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/zenobe_gramme.shtml
Zjawa IV Gdynia
Poland
class CII
ketch
1949
http://www.sailboston.com/ships/zjawa_iv.shtml
Sources:
The Halifax Chronicle-Herald, 17 July 2000,
extensive use of the Google search engine, and
Maritime Museum of the Atlantic's Tall Ships Information File
    http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/AtoZ/tallnotes.htm

All of the above URLs were valid in July 2000.
They have been reproduced here by Copy and Paste.
There are no typing errors in the URLs, because no typing was involved.

Note: The sailboat El Siest Mares was planned to be at Halifax for the Tall Ships 2000, but on the way there ran aground on a reef near Liscomb Harbour, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, about 120km east of Halifax.  The hull, made of "Ferro-cement" (reinforced concrete?), was seriously damaged by striking repeatedly (wave action) on rocks, and the vessel was detained at the wharf at Little Liscomb for several days for repairs, and did not reach Halifax during the main event.  Captain Gerald Stoddard, of Kingston, Ontario, left his home port in Ontario on June 17th and was close to his destination when the grounding occurred. 
[Guysborough Journal, 26 July 2000]



2000 July 20

New Holographic Coin Honours Bluenose

First coin with holograph

LUNENBURG — One of the most storied ships to sail out of Nova Scotia has been given yet another honour.  A special hologram collector coin was unveiled in Halifax July 20th at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic,
Bluenose holographic coin
The Royal Canadian Mint honoured
the original Bluenose on July 20th
in Halifax with the release of this
special hologram collector's coin.
bearing the image of the beloved Bluenose. The coin, issued by the Royal Canadian Mint, has a face value of $20, though it's selling for almost $60.  It's the first in a special three-coin transportation series.  The design was created by renowned Cape Breton artist J. Franklin Wright, whose work specializes in marine composition.

The new coins mark the first time a hologram has been used on change.  On hand to tribute Bluenose were Premier John Hamm, Lieutenant-Governor Myra Freeman and six members of Bluenose's crew.  The ceremony took place just steps away from Bluenose II. Danielle Wetherup, president of the Royal Canadian Mint, congratulated the people who work to keep the fishing schooner's memories alive.  "The pride inspired by Bluenose is shared by all Canadians from coast to coast," she said.  Senator Wilfred Moore, chairman of Bluenose II Preservation Trust gave a brief history of Bluenose's legacy at the ceremony.  "We commend the Royal Canadian Mint in its decision to depict the original Bluenose in the design of this new collector's coin," he said. 

There are only 15,000 copies of each coin being minted for worldwide distribution, and are available at the dealers and distributors such as local post office bureaus, although they are quickly selling out.  Coins later to be released will honour Toronto, the first locomotive to be built in Canada, and the H.S. Taylor Steam Buggy, which is considered to be Canada's first automobile.

[Lunenburg Progress-Enterprise, 26 July 2000]


2000 July 21

Tall Ships 2000 on Internet from Halifax

Extensive coverage of the Tall Ships 2000 from Halifax, in the form of both audio and video clips, is available on the Internet from the CBC.

CBC Tall Ships 2000 website
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/main.html

Tall Ships story archive — Programs aired on the CBC: The CBC is producing lots of Tall Ships-related reports and interviews.  "In this page so you can find information you may have missed or would like to see/hear again.  Content will be updated daily."
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/archive.html

Numerous CBC audio clips are available online.  Here are a few:

(Audio) Information Morning interview about what it takes to organize the Tall Ships visit to Halifax
Making it work - The Plan and The Planner, July 19th (running time 10:25)
    http://radio.cbc.ca/regional/halifax/realaudio/interviews/14.ram

(Audio) Information Morning interviews 89 year-old Clem Hiltz about his memories of surviving one of the biggest storms of the century and his days on the original Bluenose (running time 11:51)
Tall Ships Memories - A Whale of a Tale from the Days of Sail July 18th
    http://radio.cbc.ca/regional/halifax/realaudio/interviews/13.ram

(Audio) Information Morning interview: The August Gales of of 1926 and 1927 are legendary in Lunenburg County.  In fact, people there still talk about the ferocity of the storms and the lives that were tragically taken (running time 8:21)
    http://radio.cbc.ca/regional/halifax/realaudio/interviews/12.ram

Numerous CBC News video clips are available online.
Tall Ships story archive — First Edition (CBC supperhour news)
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/archives/tv_archives.html

(Video) Montage of Tall Ships in Halifax Harbour, July 20th (running time 3:22)
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/media/000720_montage.ram

(Video) The Race, July 20th, commentary by Rob Gordon (running time 1:45)
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/media/000720_race_gordon.ram

(Video) The Arrival, July 19th, commentary by Phonse Jessome (running time 2:06)
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/media/000719_jessome.ram

(Video) The Preparations, July 18th, commentary by Cynthia Kent (running time 2:01)
    http://halifax.cbc.ca/tallships2000/media/000718_kent.ram


2000 July 21

Winners of Tall Ships 2000 Race
Boston to Halifax

16-19 July 2000

The American Sail Training Association has announced the final results of the Tall Ships 2000 race from Boston to Halifax.  The results on corrected time are:
Kaiwo Maru
Kaiwo Maru

The winners for each class are: The overall race results are calculated on a Time Correction Factor (TCF).  Prior to the race, each vessel submits measurements on length of hull, beam (width of hull), sail area, rig type, age of vessel and other factors.  A computer program, maintained by the International Sail Training Association, computes a TCF based on the above factors.

For this race, the TCFs range from 0.51 to 0.94.  To calculate results, the vessel's actual time is multiplied by the TCF to provide the corrected time used for race results.  The winning vessels are then grouped by class and given their position overall in the race.

The sailing distance from the starting line at Boston to the finish line at Halifax was 350 nautical miles 650 kilometres. The first ship to arrive, Mir, arrived 3 days, 44 minutes and 52 seconds after the start.  The last to finish, Asgard II, arrived 3 days, 12 hours and 28 minutes after the start.

The race started in limited visibility conditions off Boston on 16 July and the vessels had very little wind and visibility for the first 18 hours of the race.  The race committee considered advancing the time limit to ensure the vessels' arrival in Halifax on time but maintained the original schedule when the wind picked up from the southwest 10 to 20 knots about 15 to 35 km/h, providing ideal sailing conditions for the remainder of the race to Halifax.

"After a slow start, the race was very exciting for the young trainees as they reached speeds of 9 to 14 knots 16 to 26 km/h on the various vessels," said Steve Baker, Race Director, American Sail Training Association.

Source:
Tall Ships 2000 News website
    http://www.tallships2000.com/news_show.asp?id=205


2000 July 22

New Glasgow Drive-In Movie


New Glasgow Drive-In Movie Program, 22 July 2000
[New Glasgow Evening News, 22 July 2000]


2000 July 22

The Bulletin Named the Best in Canada

Lighthouse Staff Awarded for Work, Community Service

For the first time in its 113-year history, the Bridgewater Bulletin has been named Canada's best weekly newspaper in its circulation class.

Taking top marks in a field of twenty entrants from across the country, The Bulletin was singled out for best front page, community news, presentation (page design), advertising design and production quality.  The paper also took second place for best editorial page.

The awards were presented last week in Magog, Quebec, at the 81st annual convention of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association.

In order to compete for the national general excellence awards, papers must place first, second or third in their regional competitions.  In June, both The Bulletin and The Progress Enterprise were named best papers in Atlantic Canada in their respective circulation classes.

Nationally, The Bulletin is in circulation class 6,500 to 12,499.  Judges in this competition said "while several publications provided a complete package, none were as appealing as The Bulletin.  This is a delightful newspaper from cover to cover, providing everything from well-written quality news to sharp, crisp photographs.

"The effective use of colour and white space in the advertisements conveyed their message quickly and showed character and humour.  The classified section was easy to read.  Of all the newspapers entered in this category, The Bulletin was an easy overall winner."

The Carillon from Steinbach, Manitoba placed second, while The Representative from Leduc, Alberta, earned third place honours. The Progress Enterprise received a blue ribbon award for finishing in the top third of its circulation class.

In special competitions, Lighthouse reporter Lisa Brown won first place in the best feature story competition for her two-page article on Amy Thornton.  Judges said, "Lisa Brown's interview with a young woman whose brother killed her family is riveting, emotional and an incredible tale.  A very sensitive subject handled in a very professional manner."

Also in special competitions, The Bulletin won second place for best Car Care Section.  "The section had a great cover, good theme and a strong balance between editorial content and ads," the judges said.

Lighthouse Publishing's millennium calendar project won third place in the best newspaper promotions category.  Judges said "it was a great idea that promoted community participation, a subscription drive and kept the newspaper in the mind and sight for 12 months.  A very original idea."

The Bulletin picked up another third place award in outstanding community service with its Earth Day Challenge.  "The idea for an Earth Day Challenge came from seeing how much garbage accumulated after the snow melted," judges said.  "First by issuing a challenge to the local radio station, the ball started to roll.  The Bulletin ran various ads asking for help to clean up the area.  Local business stepped in to offer everything from coffee, bottled water to non-latex gloves and garbage removal.

"The day was a resounding success due to The Bulletin.  This is true community involvement for a community newspaper.  A job well done above and beyond the day-to-day work at a community news-paper."

[Bridgewater Bulletin, 26 July 2000]

Reference:
Lighthouse Publishing Limited
    http://www.lighthouse.ns.ca/


2000 July 22

CCNA grants highest honour to Hennigars

Awards recognize their 32-year newspaper odyssey

MAGOG, QUEBEC — A Mahone Bay couple has been granted the Canadian Community Newspapers Association's (CCNA) highest honour.  Ralph and Marg Hennigar, of Lighthouse Publishing Limited, were named CCNA honorary life members July 22nd at the association's 81st National Convention in Magog, Quebec.

It was at the same convention, that their newspaper The Bridgewater Bulletin was named the best all-round Canadian newspaper with a circulation of between 6,500 and 12,499.

Ralph Hennigar, a graduate electrical engineer and lawyer, and Marg Hennigar began their newspaper odyssey in 1968.  Together they parlayed their purchase of a printing plant and a small weekly newspaper into an award-winning, high-technology community newspaper group.

They bought a printing plant from one of Ralph's clients.  It just happened to have a small weekly paper, The Progress Enterprise "that would help pay the overhead".  "With loans from several banks and $100 cash, they purchased what was supposed to be a hobby that would run itself," said their daughter Lynn Hennigar, who made the presentations to her parents.  She now serves as company president.

In 1972, they bought a competing newspaper The Bridgewater Bulletin, and a little later, changed their company name to Lighthouse Publishing Limited.  Since that time, the firm's employment level has grown from about a dozen to 48 employees who work at the company's three offices and web printing plant.  Newspaper production has gone from hot lead methods to state-of-the-art technology.

Today, The Bulletin and The Progress Enterprise have a combined circulation of 11,871 and the total market coverage publication The Lighthouse Log has a circulation of 26,000.

Over the years, the Hennigars have built up a team that has captured an impressive list of awards including first-place finishes for both The Bulletin and The Progress Enterprise in Atlantic Community Newspapers competitions.

As for "the hobby that would run itself," Marg found herself pressed into an editing post at The Progress Enterprise, soon after the couple bought the publication.  After the previous editor left, Marg "walked into the paper's office in Lunenburg and sat behind the desk, giving new meaning to on-the-job training," Lynn Hennigar said.  One of her first achievements was in creating the lighthearted family column Egbert and I, which gave humorous glimpses of Hennigar family life and provided amusing anecdotes about food and travel.  The column ran for twenty years.

But it is her editorials that are undoubtedly Marg's greatest contribution to the community newspaper field.

Since 1989, she has won a total of eighteen regional, national and international awards for her editorial writing.

In a nomination letter for the prestigious Eugene Cervi Award, veteran Prince Edward Island newspaperman Paul McNeil describes her writing as "critical but fair.  She is tough but not prone to overblown rhetoric.  Her writing style is elegant in its simplicity," Mr. McNeil wrote in recommending her for this award offered by the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors.

Although involved in all aspects of these newspapers over the years, perhaps Ralph's greatest effort and contribution has been on the legal and technical side.  After he began retiring in 1985 from the one-man law practice that grew to be the respected firm of Hennigar, Wells, Lamey and Baker, Ralph put his legal and engineering talents to work for Lighthouse Publishing.

Having built his first computer in 1978, he wrote a number of computer programs for the company.  His interest and expertise in computers keeps Lighthouse at the leading edge of technology.  "He's our in-house technical and business consultant," said Lynn Hennigar.  "Business expertise and tax planning skills are his trade mark."

Ralph has been an untiring worker and staunch supporter of the newspaper associations and was instrumental in designing the bylaws for the ACNA and CCNA.  He is a past director, secretary, treasurer and president of ACNA and a former director and past president of the CCNA.  Marg also served as a director, secretary and president of ACNA and is a former board member of CCNA.

[Bridgewater Bulletin, 2 August 2000]
[Lunenburg Progress-Enterprise, 2 August 2000]


2000 July 25

John Bragg Had a Good Year

Wealthiest Nova Scotian

For cable magnate John Bragg, 1999 was a very good year.  According to Canadian Business magazine's profile of the nation's 100 wealthiest people, the 60-year-old blueberry king of Collingwood, Cumberland County, rose seven places in the ranking from last year's survey to reach 60th place, the top ranking for any Nova Scotian.  And likely more importantly from his perspective, Bragg increased his net worth from about $350,000,000 to about $500,000,000.  The magazine credits some of the growth to the 4,000 customers who have signed on for local phone services courtesy of his cable company, EastLink.  There were two other Nova Scotians in the list of Canada's richest people, which was topped by media mogul Ken Thomson, who had a net worth estimated at $23,500,000,000.  Halifax industrialist Ken Rowe also had a good year according to Canadian Business.  The IMP Group owner rose from 86th place to 80th while adding almost $100,000,000 to his new worth to hit $380,000,000.  The Stellarton-based Sobeys family fell to 80th place, down from 64 last year.  The family added only $5,000,000 to its net worth in 1999, the magazine said.  Annapolis Valley titans, the Jodrey family, stood at 78th place with $305,000,000 in last year's survey, but fell out of the rankings after the magazine adjusted its estimates of the secrective family's holdings.
[Halifax Daily News, 25 July 2000]

References:
Oxford Frozen Foods Limited
    http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ic/cdc/heirloom_series/volume1/chapter17/Oxford.htm
Nova Scotia's lowbush blueberry marketing system
    http://agri.gov.ns.ca/nsbi/wbic/hist/kinsman5090/chap16.htm
"The Rich 100," Canadian Business, 13 August 1999
John Bragg: Net worth: $350 million (1999) — cable television, frozen berries, real estate, building supplies — "little-known Maritime entrepreneur"
    http://www.canadianbusiness.com/special_lists/july30_99_rich1003.html




As of 25 July 2000, the Nova Scotia Registry of Joint Stock Companies records showed John Bragg as a director of the following companies (this list is incomplete):


As of 18 January 2000, SEDAR records showed John Bragg as a director (since 1994) of Shaw Communications Incorporated, Calgary, Alberta.  Shaw Communications Inc. is a diversified Canadian communications company with core cable television, Internet and satellite businesses.  Shaw provides broadband cable television and Internet services to approximately 1.8 million customers, representing about 22% of the Canadian cable television market.  Shaw's interest in the satellite industry is through an approximate 62% equity interest in Canadian Satellite Communications Inc. (Cancom), a provider of satellite communications and broadcasting services including digital direct to home (DTH) television services.  Shaw also holds a portfolio of investments in Internet, interactive television, e-commerce and telecommunications companies.  Shaw's total revenue for the year ended August 31, 1999 and for the six months ended February 29, 2000 was approximately $709,400,000 and $441,300,000 respectively.  As at February 29, 2000, Shaw had assets of approximately $4,100,000,000.

March 23, 2000 — Rogers Communications Incorporated (Rogers) and Shaw Communications Incorporated (Shaw) today announced a wide-ranging series of agreements pursuant to which they have agreed to a major swap of cable assets and the creation of strategic Internet alliances.  These agreements included the following:

As part of a strategy of building a national Internet backbone company, Shaw announced earlier this week a transaction with 360networks (formerly Worldwide Fiber Inc.) that would see Shaw invest US$100 million in 360networks, acquire a national dark fibre network for $225 million, and commit to purchase approximately $25 million of OC-48 capacity over a 3 to 4 year period.  Rogers has agreed to invest $125 million in the new Internet backbone company and receive a 49% interest in the new company.  Shaw and Rogers will commit all of their Internet backbone traffic to this new company.

Source: SEDAR — System for Electronic Document Archiving and Retrieval, operated by the Canadian Repository for Securities
    http://www.sedar.com/

Video Servers in Strategic Clusters
from Victoria to Halifax

On March 20, 2000, Shaw and 360networks (formerly Worldwide Fiber Inc.) announced a strategic relationship that will see Shaw make an equity investment of U.S.$100 million in 360networks and enter into a capacity lease arrangement and purchase of a national fibre optic network.  The combined value of the capacity lease and fibre network is estimated at C$250 million.  This investment will take place over a 3-year period and replaces a portion of the capital expenditure program previously contemplated to meet Shaw's growing demand for broadband Internet backbone capacity.  The network will serve as the national platform for Shaw's broadband Internet services and an interconnection for high capacity video servers that will be situated in strategic clusters from Victoria to Halifax.
Source: Shaw news release, 27 March 2000
    http://www.shaw.ca/investor_relations/press/quarters/000327_qtr2.htm


Reference:
Shaw Communications Incorporated website http://www.shaw.ca/


2000 July 25

Fibre Optic Mega-Project
Brings Temporary Economic Boom to Sheet Harbour

Trans-Atlantic Cables Again Important in Nova Scotia

It's the Internet

Local stevedores are busy transferring about 2,500 kilometres of high-speed fibre optic cable from a freighter to an adjacent cable-laying vessel docked at the North Atlantic Marine Terminal, at Sheet Harbour in eastern Halifax County.

"In a 24-hour period, we have two gangs of 32 stevedores each out on two 12-hour shifts," said Malcolm Swinemar, vice-president of marketing for Ceres, the terminal operator.  The cable transfer is expected to be completed this week.

"It certainly creates a lot of man hours of work," Mr. Swinemar said.  "Transferring fibre optic cable from one ship to another is a very labour-intensive program."

Besides jobs, the project has provided a boost to business in the Eastern Shore community.

"It's been a mini-boom," said Ralph LeBlanc, owner of Fairwinds Motel in Sheet Harbour.  Seven of his motel's ten units will be occupied by project workers until the end of the month.  "Normally this time of year, 95 per cent of the units are occupied by tourists and 5 per cent by workers," he said.  "But this year it has flipped, with 60 per cent of the units occupied by workers and 40 per cent by tourists."

Down the road at the Sheet Harbour Motel, the story is much the same — workers are staying in seven of the motel's twelve units.

The Bahamian-registered freighter CEC Westoe arrived in Sheet Harbour on July 17th, with its hold filled with huge coils of the Japanese-made cable.

Two days later, the vessel met up with the Japanese cable-layer Subaru, which had just finished laying a section of the cable in the Atlantic and had come to Sheet Harbour to be resupplied.
Fibre Optic Cable
Lowell Moser, a stevedore, stands atop a huge coil
of fibre optic cable being transferred from a freighter
to Japanese cable-laying vessel Subaru at the
marine terminal at Sheet Harbour, Nova Scotia.


The cable is part of TAT (Trans-Atlantic) 14, the latest in a series of fibre optic cables that a European-American consortium is having installed.

The 2,500 kilometres of cable being loaded aboard Subaru represents about 20 per cent of the 12,000-kilometre system, said a spokesman close to the project who declined to be identified.

TAT 14 is a loop that starts and ends in New Jersey.  When completed, it will link the United States to Norway, Germany, Holland, France and England.

If one side of the loop fails, the spokesman said information can still flow back and forth on the other side.

He said ten ships are involved in the project, which is about 70 per cent complete.  The cable is expected to be ready for service early next year.

"The cable can carry hundreds of thousands of high-speed digital data channels," the spokesman said.  The project is all Internet-driven, which demands high-speed capacity.

"Satellites can't come close to the speed of fibre optic cables," he said.

The spokesman said that before installation, the route was pre-measured to determine the exact distance.  The ocean floor was also mapped to ensure the cable goes around undersea obstructions.

In coastal waters, where there is a need to protect the cable from fishing activity, he said Subaru is equipped to dig-in and bury the cable in a trench five metres deep.  It's the first Japanese system ever to be used in laying cable in the Atlantic, he added.

Cable Ship Subaru
Cable Ship Subaru
Home port: Yokohama
Registry: Japan


Global Marine is project leader in partnership with NTT-WEN, the Japanese firm installing the cable.

Sheet Harbour is not the only Nova Scotia community benefiting from fibre optic technology.

Herring Cove — a Halifax suburb — is the Canadian landfall for a competing high-speed transatlantic fibre optic network.  Vancouver-based 360networks is putting the finishing touches on a 2,700-square-metre cable landfall station just outside Halifax, which will be part of an $80-million investment in the province.  The $1,200,000,000 Hibernia fibre optic network is a high-capacity system designed to satisfy increasing demand for telecommunications capability between North America and Europe.

That 12,200-kilometre system will link cable landing stations in Halifax, Nova Scotia; Dublin, Ireland; Liverpool, England; and Boston, Massachusetts.  The Halifax station, on 16 hectares at Hospital Point in Herring Cove, will handle three undersea cables — two transatlantic legs and one to Boston.

[Halifax Chronicle-Herald, 25 July 2000]


2000 July 25

Summer Schedule Extended Four Weeks
for Ferry Service to Newfoundland

Heavy traffic this year

The summer ferry service between North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Argentia, Newfoundland, will be extended by four weeks this season, the operator announced yesterday.  The service, which was supposed to end September 16th, will offer departures from North Sydney every Monday at 8:00am local time until October 16th.  The ferry will depart Argentia every Tuesday at 8:00am local time until October 17th.  Marine Atlantic, the Crown corporation that operates the service, said the extension was needed to handle heavier tourist traffic.  "More and more tourists are travelling on the shoulders of the traditional tourist peak season in summer these days," said Roger Jamieson, president of Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador.  Ferry service between North Sydney and Port aux Basques, which is a much shorter route, continues year round.  The longer route is shut down during the winter months when the rougher weather moves in.  About 500,000 people are expected to use the service this year.
[Halifax Chronicle-Herald, 25 July 2000]
[Halifax Daily News, 25 July 2000]


2000 July 26

Internet Much Bigger Than We Thought

Vast resources invisible to conventional searches

Existing search engines can't reach the Deep Web

The Internet has become so large so fast that sophisticated search engines are just scratching the surface of the Web's vast information reservoir, according to a new study released Wednesday, July 26th.

The 41-page research paper, prepared by a South Dakota company that has developed new software to plumb the Internet's depths, estimates the World Wide Web is 500 times larger than the maps provided by popular search engines like Yahoo!, AltaVista and Google.com.

These hidden information coves, well-known to the Net savvy, have become a tremendous source of frustration for researchers who can't find the information they need with a few simple keystrokes.  "These days it seems like search engines are a little like the weather: Everyone likes to complain about them," said Danny Sullivan, editor of SearchEngineWatch.com, which analyzes search engines.

For years, the uncharted territory of the Internet's World Wide Web sector has been dubbed the "invisible Web." BrightPlanet, the Sioux Falls start-up behind Wednesday's report, describes the terrain as the "deep Web" to distinguish from the surface information captured by Internet search engines.  "It's not an invisible Web anymore.  That's what so cool about we are doing," said Thane Paulsen, BrightPlanet's general manager.  Many researchers suspected that these underutilized outposts of cyberspace represented a substantial chunk of the Internet, but no one seems to have explored the Web's back roads as extensively as BrightPlanet.

Deploying new software developed over the past six months, BrightPlanet estimates there are now about 550 billion documents stored on the Web.

Deep Web now contains about 7,500 terabytes of information

Public information on the Deep Web is currently 400 to 550 times larger than the commonly defined World Wide Web.  The Deep Web contains 7,500 terabytes of information, compared to 19 terabytes of information in the surface Web.  The Deep Web contains nearly 550 billion individual documents compared to the 1 billion of the surface Web.  More than an estimated 100,000 Deep Web sites presently exist.  Sixty of the largest Deep Web sites collectively contain about 750 terabytes of information — sufficient by themselves to exceed the size of the surface Web by 40 times.

Combined, Internet search engines index about one billion pages.  One of the first Web search engines, Lycos, had an index of 54,000 pages in mid-1994.

While search engines obviously have come a long way since 1994, they aren't indexing even more pages because an increasing amount of information is stored in evolving, giant databases set up by government agencies, universities and corporations.

Search engines rely on technology that generally identifies "static" pages, rather than the "dynamic" information stored in databases.

This means that general-purpose search engines will guide users to the home site that houses a huge database, but finding out what's in them requires additional queries.

BrightPlanet believes it has developed a solution with software called "LexiBot." With a single search request, the technology not only searches the pages indexed by traditional search engines, but delves into the databases on the Internet and fishes out the information in them.

The LexiBot isn't for everyone, BrightPlanet executives concede.  For one thing, the software costs money — US$89.95 after a free 30-day trial.  For another, a LexiBot search isn't fast.  Typical searches will take 10 to 25 minutes to complete, but could require up to 90 minutes for the most complex requests.  "This isn't for grandma when she is looking for chocolate chip recipes on the Internet," Paulsen said.

The privately held company expects LexiBot to be particularly popular in academic and scientific circles.  It also plans to sell its technology and services to businesses.

About 95 percent of the information stored in the deep Web is free, according to BrightPlanet.

Several Internet veterans who reviewed BrightPlanet's research Wednesday were intrigued, but warned that the company's software could be too overwhelming.

"The World Wide Web is getting to be so humongous that you need specialized engines.  A centralized approach like this isn't going to be successful," predicted Carl Malamud, co-founder of Petaluma-based Invisible Worlds.

Like BrightPlanet, Invisible Worlds is trying to extract more data hidden from search engines, but is customizing the information.

Malamud calls this process "giving context to the content." Sullivan agreed that BrightPlanet's greatest challenge will be showing businesses and individuals how to effectively deploy the company's breakthrough.

"No one else has come up with something like this yet, so when they fetch people all this information on the deep Web, they are going to have to show people where to dive in.  Otherwise, people will just drown."

Sources:
Associated Press story, 26 July 2000
    http://www.infobeat.com/stories/cgi/story.cgi?id=2568446616-9d8
and Deep Web FAQs
    http://www.completeplanet.com/help/help_deepwebFAQs.asp




"BrightPlanet.com LLC is a privately held company founded in 1999 and is based in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  BrightPlanet's Internet content services are based on the first and only search technology capable of mining the combined 'surface' and 'deep' content from the World Wide Web.  The deep Web is a vast reservoir of Internet content that is 500 times larger than the known World Wide Web.  There are literally hundreds of billions of highly valuable documents hidden in an estimated 100,000 searchable databases applicable to every market and domain.  Content from these searchable databases can not be identified using existing search engines.  Only BrightPlanet can harvest this deep content and integrate it with standard Web content."
    http://www.brightplanet.com/

References:
BrightPlanet's Deep Web white paper is available at
    http://www.completeplanet.com/Tutorials/DeepWeb/index.asp

Deep Web FAQs     http://www.completeplanet.com/help/help_deepwebFAQs.asp
Search Engine Watch — comprehensive and current coverage of search engines
    http://www.searchenginewatch.com/
InvisibleWorlds
    http://invisible.net/

"Drowning in Data" Scientific American, October 1999
    http://www.sciam.com/explorations/1999/100499data/

Extensive Deep Web Resources in Nova Scotia

There is a lot of "Deep Web" information — not indexed and not reported by the usual search engines we all use — right here in Nova Scotia.  Much of it has been placed on the Net by the Nova Scotia Government, and the invisibility of this information is highlighted by the simple fact that it is not reported even by the Government's own search service, let alone the biggies like Google and AltaVista and Yahoo and Inktomi.

The local Deep Web resource I use most often nowadays is the database maintained (updated daily) by the Nova Scotia Registry of Joint Stock Companies (RJSC), at http://www.gov.ns.ca/snsmr/rjsc/.  This database — the legal record of all incorporated companies, non-profit societies, and similar business organizations — provides convenient examples of what is meant by the "Deep Web".  RJSC operates a search service built into this database, but this search service barely scratches the surface.  You can search for information only by keywords that appear in the legal name of the company.

You cannot do a search for the name of a person who is a Director of any company.  For example, if you want to find which companies (or societies, etc.) have John C.  Trail as a director, the RJSC search service won't work.  Neither will any other search engine perform this search within the RJSC database.

All companies have an official Registered Agent, but you cannot do a search for companies whose Registered Agent is Bobby Klobber, or Ralph Kramden, or any other name.  (The Registered Agent is an interesting category — companies which have the same person as Registered Agent often are closely related.)

The RJSC database has a record of the name of the President of many companies, but you cannot do a search on this information.

You cannot do a search for telecom companies.  If the word "telecom" appears in the company's legal name, the RJSC search service will report it, otherwise not.  For each company, the database includes a field "Nature of Business" but this field is invisible to the RJSC search service (and to all other search engines).  You cannot do a search for service stations, or for paving companies, or for building contractors, or for any other line of business.  This information exists within the database, but is invisible to all search services, including that operated by the RJSC itself.

You may want to search for companies with offices in a certain location.  For example, you may want to obtain a list of companies with offices in Yarmouth, or in Springhill, or in Inverness, or in postal code B0P 1H0, or in telephone exchange 234.  The RJSC database contains this information, but the RJSC search service does not report it.  Neither does any other search engine.  All this is part of the Deep Web.

There are certain special legal categories recorded in the database but invisible to searches.  For example, in Nova Scotia there is a special category known as "Unlimited Liability" companies, but you can't do a search for such companies as a type of corporation — only for those which have "Unlimited Liability" as part of the company name (and many do not).

Remember, none of this is secret.  All of it is public information.  These details are posted on the Internet and — in principle — are available to anyone with an Internet connection and a browser, and lots of time and perseverance and savvy.  The catch is — how do you find this stuff?

There are many other Nova Scotia "Deep Web" information sources.  For example, three newspaper archives, operated by:
  • The Halifax Herald Limited http://www.herald.ns.ca/
    Chronicle-Herald and Mail-Star
    current issues and five back issues (one week)
  • Lighthouse Publishing Limited http://www.lighthouse.ns.ca/
    Bridgewater Bulletin and Lunenburg Progress-Enterprise
    current issues and nine back issues (nine weeks)
  • The Cape Breton Post http://www.capebretonpost.com/
    current issue and 500+ back issues (from October 1998)



Internet Now Has About 20,000 Search Engines

There may be on the order of 20,000 to 25,000 total search engines currently on the Web.
Source:
BrightPlanet's 41-page white paper on the Deep Web
§ "Thousands of Conventional Search Engines Remain Undiscovered"
    http://www.completeplanet.com/Tutorials/DeepWeb/results_500times15.asp#_Toc481504052


2000 July 26

Projection Equipment Upgrade for Liverpool Movie Theatre

Only movie theatre between Halifax and Shelburne

The Region of Queens is buying new projection equipment for the Astor Theatre's movie operations.  The regional council decided to purchase the equipment from a theatre which recently closed in the Annapolis Valley.  Getting the new system into working order will require upgrading the theatre's electrical wiring.  CAO David Clattenburg said renovations had to be made to the electrical room, including fire-rated walls and ceiling.  The total cost for the improvements is budgeted at $26,500, which includes the installation of a 400-ampere electrical panel.  The money will come from the general operating accumulated surplus account.  Mayor Christopher Clarke said the new machinery replaces projection equipment from the 1950s.
[Liverpool Advance, 26 July 2000]


2000 July 26

Time Runs Out for Liverpool's Parking Meters

The Municipality of the Region of Queens has decided to remove the parking meters in downtown Liverpool.  The decision came after the South Queens Chamber of Commerce encouraged the regional council to remove the meters believing it would help stimulate business.  The eighty existing meters have been generating about $25,000 a year in parking revenue and fines.  The issue surfaced when Senior Constable John Croft reported that nine outdated meters are in need of repair and parts are no longer available.  Last week, another five meters were reported to be not working.  Replacing the entire fleet of eighty meters has been estimated to cost about $25,000.  The removal of the meters has been under consideration for some time.  In its 2000-2001 budget, approved several months ago, the regional council eliminated the line item which indicates revenue from parking meters and fines.
[Liverpool Advance, 26 July 2000]





Go To:   History of Telegraph and Telephone Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://ns1758.ca/tele/telephone.html

Go To:   History of Railway Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://ns1758.ca/rail/railways.html

Go To:   History of Electric Power Companies in Nova Scotia
    http://ns1758.ca/electric/electric.html

Go To:   History of Automobiles in Nova Scotia
    http://ns1758.ca/auto/automobiles.html

Go To:   Nova Scotia History, Chapter One
    http://newscotland1398.ca/hist/nshistory01.html

Go To:   Nova Scotia in the War of 1812
    http://ns1758.ca/1812war/war1812-atlantic.html#war1812-novascot

Go To:   Nova Scotia Historical Biographies
    http://newscotland1398.ca/hist/nshistory00.html#ns-historical-biog

Go To:   Proclamations: Land Grants in Nova Scotia 1757, '58, '59
    http://planter2010.ca/proc/proclamations-ndx.html

Go To:   Statutes of Nova Scotia, 1805, edited by Richard John Uniacke
    http://ns1763.ca/law/ns-statutes1805-titlepg.html

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